Posted on October 01, 2018

First Nation Health Authority Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is Jordan’s Principle?

Jordan's Principle is about ensuring First Nations receive the services they need when they need them.

Jordan's Principle:

• Applies to all First Nations children on- and off-reserve.

• Applies to all public services, including services that are beyond the normative standard of care to ensure substantive equality.

• Provides payment for needed services by the government or department that first receives the request

The First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) is responsible for administering Jordan’s Principle resources in British Columbia. This approach however does not limit or relieve the federal government of its fiduciary responsibilities to First Nations in BC.

Jordan's Principle applies in BC. This arrangement does not hinder its definition or implementation. Those accessing Jordan's Principle in BC still have the right to call the federal government. Contact information is within question 4 below and at right.

To implement Jordan's Principle, the Government of Canada is working to:

1. Resolve situations where governments and departments cannot agree about who should pay for services and supports to meet the needs of a First Nations child

2. Cover the costs of all public services and ensure substantive equality

3. Facilitate access to all services and supports for all First Nations children without delay or disruption

Read the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings: 2016 CHRT, 2017 CHRT 14 and 2018 CHRT 4. Read a Summary of Orders from the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada here.

2. Who is eligible?

All First Nations children 0-19 years with an identified need for a publicly funded health or social service or support are included including services beyond the normative standard of care, regardless of their health or social status, or place of residency (on- or off-reserve).

3. What services and supports are included?

Jordan's Principle applies to all public services, including services that are beyond the normative standard of care to ensure substantive equality.

4. Who do children or families contact to get access to services and support?

Who do children or families contact to get access to services and support?

Anyone who is aware of a First Nation child who is not receiving the services and supports they need, is encouraged to contact us through:

Jordan’s Principle Implementation

1.866.913.0033

[email protected]

Those accessing Jordan's Principle in BC still have the right to call the federal government at any time.

To report a Jordan's Principle case directly to the federal government call centre, please call the 24-hour line or visit www.canada.ca/jordans-principle.

• English: 1-855-JP CHILD (1-855-572-4453)

• French: 1-833-PJ ENFAN (1-833-753-6326)

• TTY: 1-866-553-0554

Please note: Inquiries will receive an evaluation and determination within 12-48 hours of receipt for individual requests and within 48 hours to 1 week for group requests.

Urgent cases will be assessed as soon as possible.

5. Is there a difference in services and supports if a First Nations child lives on or off a reserve?

Under Jordan’s Principle, a First Nations child is eligible for the same services if they live on or off a reserve.

FNHA will apply Jordan’s Principle to all First Nations children, regardless of residence and status. This approach recognizes that the process of colonization over the past 150 years resulted in many small reserves, scattered across the province, with small populations, limited administration capabilities, a small land base, and other unique barriers which force First Nations people have to leave their communities to access to access public services.

6. What is different in British Columbia?

Jordan's Principle applies in BC. This arrangement does not hinder its definition or implementation. Those accessing Jordan's Principle in BC still have the right to call the federal government at any time.

Through high-level agreements and many years of working closely with federal and provincial governments, the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) has built a strong foundation to address systemic barriers and health inequities for BC First Nations. The FNHA has also built a province-wide infrastructure that facilitates good working relationships with First Nations communities and their health service organizations across the Province.

Some jurisdictional barriers that persist elsewhere across Canada are being addressed in BC. In 2006, the Province of BC confirmed that it has responsibility for providing health services to all residents of BC, including First Nations. Additionally, committees, such as the Committee on First Nations Health and the Implementation Committee, work in direct partnership with FNHA to advance progress on issues like Jordan’s Principle here in BC.

7. Who are Systems Navigators and how can they help children and families get access to service and supports?

Local Systems Navigators are being staffed in BC to provide children and families with a knowledgeable local resource to help them navigate the full range of existing federal, provincial and First Nations health and social programs and services to address their needs.

System navigation does not limit the time frames associated with Jordan's Principle case response. Key elements of the FNHA’s approach to system navigation will include:

• FNHA will serve all First Nations, regardless of residence

• System Navigators will assess needs; facilitate early intervention; develop integrated care plans; connect the child and family to needed services; remove the stress of navigating service systems; support families as they manage their needs; and involve relevant partners in each case, as necessary, to expediently address immediate service gaps

• FNHA will coordinate with other programs like child family services, education, early childhood to ensure proper implementation of Jordan's Principle.

In BC, the Systems Navigation function will be delivered by the FNHA. The positions will be funded by Health Canada through Contribution Agreements. The new positions will not duplicate existing navigation or liaison functions within Provincial or First Nations health service organizations; but will provide additional complementary hands-on assistance to First Nations children and families in BC.

8. How quickly are requests processed under Jordan’s Principle?

Inquiries will receive an evaluation and determination within 12-48 hours of receipt for individual requests and within 48 hours to 1 week for group requests.

CHRT requires Canada to provide services immediately where irremediable harm is reasonably foreseeable.

Urgent cases will be assessed as soon as possible.


For more information about Jordan's Principle and how to access services and supports contact us:

Jordan’s Principle Implementation

1.866.913.0033

[email protected]

Those accessing Jordan's Principle in BC still have the right to call the federal government at any time.

To report a Jordan's Principle case directly to the federal government call centre, please call the 24-hour line or visit www.canada.ca/jordans-principle.

• English: 1-855-JP CHILD (1-855-572-4453)

• French: 1-833-PJ ENFAN (1-833-753-6326)

• TTY: 1-866-553-0554

9. What is different about the new approach to Jordan’s Principle?

In 2016, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) determined that the federal government's approach to services for First Nations children was discriminatory. One way of addressing this is through a renewed approach to Jordan’s Principle.

Since the ruling, the CHRT has issued a number of follow-up orders about Jordan’s Principle. In May 2017, the CHRT ordered “substantive equality” under Jordan’s Principle for First Nations children. This means giving extra help when it is needed so First Nations children have an equal chance to thrive.

Jordan’s Principle addresses the needs of First Nations children by ensuring that there are no gaps in government services to them:

• address gaps in services such as mental health, special education, dental, physical therapy, speech therapy, medical equipment and physiotherapy, but it is not limited to those areas.

• provide services to First Nations children even when the service is not available to other children if it is needed to achieve substantive equality.

o Substantive equality recognizes that First Nations children may need additional supports to achieve the same outcomes as other children because they or their family have experienced disadvantages other children do not experience.

o Substantive equality seeks to acknowledge and overcome the barriers that have led to inequality in the first place

10. Why doesn’t Jordan’s Principle have its own fund to cover services and supports?

Jordan’s Principle is about meeting the needs of all First Nations children immediately and over the long term. We are working closely with our First Nations partners to build a structure of well-coordinated care for the years to come. Currently, Health Canada is supporting the FNHA in the development of a new Framework for Child and Youth Health and Wellness Systems Navigation in BC. Through the development of this Framework, funding required for a longer-term structure will be determined.

11. What if a First Nations child doesn’t have their status registration number yet?

A status number is not required.

12. Can families appeal decisions under Jordan’s Principle?

Yes, appeals for Jordan’s Principle follow the same process as FNHA Health Benefits appeals. The recipient (or parent/guardian) is asked to forward a letter of appeal and supporting documentation by mail. There are three levels of appeal available. For these steps, please click here.

Additional information

For more information about Jordan's Principle and how to access services and supports contact us:

Jordan’s Principle Implementation

1.866.913.0033

[email protected]

Those accessing Jordan's Principle in BC still have the right to call the federal government at any time.

To report a Jordan's Principle case directly to the federal government call centre, please call the 24-hour line or visit www.canada.ca/jordans-principle.

• English: 1-855-JP CHILD (1-855-572-4453)

• French: 1-833-PJ ENFAN (1-833-753-6326)

• TTY: 1-866-553-0554

Please note: Inquiries will receive an evaluation and determination within 12-48 hours of receipt for individual requests and within 48 hours to 1 week for group requests.

Urgent cases will be assessed as soon as possible.

Splatsin Community Contact: Crystal Morris, Jordan Principle & Cultural Coordinator

(250)307-1664 or [email protected]